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PRO- SMART, SENSIBLE,
COMPATIBLE GROWTH

Neighbors from Raleigh's Inman Park, Carrollton Woods, Woodbury, and Birchwood Hills have met four times with representatives of the Michigan developer that wants to rezone and build Lead Mine Tower at the corner of Lead Mine Road and Philcrest Drive. With the help of District A City Councilman Patrick Buffkin, we have tried in good faith to negotiate conditions that would keep the project from harming our established neighborhoods.

But as the proposal goes to the Raleigh City Council, it stands at a whopping 50 units per acre, 68 feet tall along Lead Mine Road, with very little green space, forcing heavy runoff into a tributary of flood-prone Crabtree Creek, and displacing affordable housing -- all while adding almost 2,000 more cars per day on already-overloaded roads and towering over single-family homes downhill only 50 feet away. 

This is NOT a NIMBY fight or even a push to preserve the site's existing R-4 zoning. We're pro-growth. But we believe growth should be smart, sensible, and compatible with existing neighborhoods. Don't you?

 
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NEWS & OBSERVER OPINION

May 3, 2021

Tuesday, Raleigh City Council will consider a rezoning that would shoehorn 250 luxury apartments onto only five unincorporated acres near Crabtree Valley.

NEIGHBORS CONCERNED ABOUT PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT NEAR CRABTREE VALLEY MALL

March 29, 2021

"What’s proposed is 50 units per acre, 50 feet behind houses in this single-family neighborhood, several neighborhoods in fact,”

PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT NEAR CRABTREE VALLEY MALL WORRIES NEARBY RESIDENTS

March 26, 2021

"Traffic congestion is a daily problem for the area, Perry said, and the proposed development would bring thousands more car trips daily."

RALEIGH RESIDENTS OPPOSE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT NEAR CRABTREE VALLEY MALL

April 15, 2021

“We're not anti-development at all, we're for smart development. Unfortunately, it's too big of a development on too small of a lot, in an area that doesn't have enough infrastructure in place to be able to handle it. That's a great spot for the missing middle housing.”